7 Key Questions to Guide Your Decision

Antonilacinai

7 questions for you who want to reorganize

I am not a big fan of reorgs, having suffered through oh so many of them, but I get that you sometimes need to. Here are seven questions to consider and reflect upon (preferably in a workshop)

  1. What will your market look like in the next few years?
  2. Are you today optimized to serve that market?
  3. What is the strength of your current organization? What is the weakness?
  4. What is the gain if you reorganize? What are the new problems you will have? If so, how do you solve them?
  5. How do you involve the employees in your thoughts? Are there key people you must bring in early? Which?
  6. Are there personal reasons for reorganizing? (example: people you like or dislike who you want to move up or down). Is it right to reorganize for that reason?
  7. How do you intend to measure the new organization’s managers, departments, subsidiaries, etc.? What are the pros and cons? How do you handle them?

Reorgs can be a pain, but also very useful

PS – which of the 7 questions resonates with you?

Team Antoni Explains

Antoni Lacnai’s seven questions provide a thoughtful framework for anyone considering a reorganization within their organization.

Let’s break down each question and discuss their significance:

What will your market look like in the next few years?

This question emphasizes the importance of understanding the external environment. It prompts leaders to consider future trends and changes in the market, helping ensure that the organization aligns with evolving demands.

Are you today optimized to serve that market?

Building on the first question, this one focuses on the current state of the organization. It encourages reflection on whether the existing structure, processes, and strategies are aligned with the anticipated changes in the market.

What is the strength of your current organization? What is the weakness?

This question prompts a self-assessment of the organization. Identifying strengths and weaknesses helps in making informed decisions during the reorganization process.

What is the gain if you reorganize? What are the new problems you will have? If so, how do you solve them?

This question addresses the expected outcomes of the reorganization. It urges leaders to consider both the benefits and potential challenges that may arise, encouraging strategic planning to mitigate risks.

How do you involve the employees in your thoughts? Are there key people you must bring in early? Which?

Employee involvement is crucial during a reorganization. This question emphasizes the importance of communication and collaboration, ensuring that key stakeholders are engaged from the early stages.

Related: Antoni Lacinai’s Five Steps to Propel Motivation and Achieve Success

Are there personal reasons for reorganizing? (example: people you like or dislike who you want to move up or down). Is it right to reorganize for that reason?

This question addresses the potential pitfalls of personal biases influencing the reorganization process. It highlights the need for objective decision-making based on organizational needs rather than personal preferences.

How do you intend to measure the new organization’s managers, departments, subsidiaries, etc.? What are the pros and cons? How do you handle them?

Measurement and evaluation are crucial for assessing the success of the reorganization. This question prompts leaders to think about the metrics and criteria for evaluating the performance of different elements within the organization post-reorg.

These questions collectively provide a comprehensive framework for approaching reorganizations in a thoughtful and strategic manner. The emphasis on market analysis, organizational self-assessment, employee engagement, and objective decision-making aligns with best practices for effective change management.

The choice of which question resonates the most would depend on the specific context and challenges faced by the team considering the reorganization.

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